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4techeads

Technical articles and discussions about motorcycle - scooter repair and maintenance.
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Product Reviews

Unbiased product reviews on bike gear, tools and general shop stuff.
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General Discussions

Pre-purchase discussions, Safety.
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Group Rides

Future rides to be scheduled
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  • davefollmer
    Mar 6, 2018

    Hii.. I took a break when the Rexxar fiasco happened, decided to come back when I'd heard that they are going to update Rexxar to work as he should have in the beginning. Dunno if it's just because I came back with new eyes and a fresh mindset or what, but I'm seriously asking the title just looking over the card lists. Please help..! I didn't find the right solution from the Internet. References:- https://goo.gl/vfMrYg Startup Explainers Thanks!
  • gearheadsworkshops
    Jan 8, 2017

    2017 is going to usher in a bunch of changes. New prez, new policies and yes gas prices will continue their steady march upwards into the foreseeable future. Be prepared for sticker shock. We have been on a gas holiday for the past few years driven in part by large inventories of oil. High supply and diminishing demand pushes prices lower. The main drivers for the over supply have been the Saudi's in a effort to drive the fracking oil boom in the US out of business. On a geopolitical level they have been trying to hurt Iran and Russia also members of Opec, for supporting the Syrian regime. The Saudi's and others have to sell crude at a minimum of $75 per barrel and those kind of prices haven't been seen in a while. Wait so what does this have to do with bikes. I'm getting to that. Since the realization by the Saudi's late last year that they cannot completely kill the fracking industry in the US and will undoubtedly grow under Trump and since the Syrian situation it seems will resolve itself in the regimes favor, the Saudi's and others have a lot of catching up to do. So expect gas prices to rise dramatically this year. The best time to buy a bike is in the Winter when demand is low and there is still a decent supply. Also when prices spike high in the spring for gas, people will start clamoring, the want ads for bikes. This phenomena happened a few years back and I remember that some bikes were selling well over $1000 of the blue book value. They were snapped up quickly. This puts a lot or pressure on a buyer to make decisions quickly as the seller no doubt will tell you he or she has 5 other people behind you ready to come over and buy it. This can lead to making some bad decisions as there are still going to be bikes out there that could need work. They may start and run but they could need as much as $700 - $1,200 in work on a retail level. So it will be best to shop early you have about 2 months before the shit storm hits and you will have some time to evaluate the bike and you can even haggle a little now if the bike needs work. But you need two things to do that one is the time and less market pressure and the knowledge to know how to evaluate a bike and you can get the latter here at this meetup and at my web site and of course through the classes that I offer. Each year I get many students who take my class because they made some bad choices in bikes. It is an easy thing to do if you don't know what to look for. Once you know what the issues are and roughly what they will cost you can then make a more informed decision and offer and then proceed to fix the issues yourself. Win, win.
  • gearheadsworkshops
    Jan 5, 2017

    The motorcycle chain is one of the most neglected parts on the bike until something goes wrong one day. That something is the chain snaps and leaves you stranded and waiting for a tow. That is an inconvenience but a chain break could distract you with a sudden loss in power, damage the bike and cause you to lose control. That would be a bad day. The good news is that it doesn't have to go down that way if you understand the care and feeding of your chain. Yep, it's all about maintenance. If you ride during our rainy season, water on the road takes its toll on your chain and it is not about just rust. When it rains the water mixes with whatever is on the road which is a mixture of chemicals called pollution, dust which is abrasive. The water forms a slurry that gets into the chain and breaks down whatever lube you have on the surface of the chain. Chains by design are internally lubricated. Chains are constructed of link plates, pins, bushings and rollers. In order for a chain to roll around a sprocket the pins must have clearance through the bushing holes allowing them to pivot. That clearance begins at about .0005", or 1/6 of a human hair. The pins and bushings are subjected to continual pivoting, and as they pass a sprocket, steel against steel wear occurs. This causes the pins and their mating holes to wear in an eccentric manner as the diagram below shows. In abrasive conditions (and especially mud) grains of sand are introduced between these mating surfaces and wear is accelerated many times over. A sealed chain (O-ring, X-ring, Z-ring ...) acts to prevent abrasives from entering this pivoting joint and also holds minute amounts of high performance grease to minimize wear. Without periodic maintenance, the chain becomes devoid of any external lubrication and protection. Lube even acts as a sun screen to protect the delicate seals from the effects of the sun. Lube reduces the natural break down of rubbers due to outgassing of plastizers that keep them flexible. Within a period of months the seals start to crack and break down and will soon fail. One thing that I outline in my classes is what the weak links are on your bike and rubber is high on the list of weak actors. With the seal now compromised the internal lubricant now starts to seep out and dirt starts to migrate in. Wear increases exponentially and most chain manufacturers limit chain wear to approximately .006" per link. If you take that number and multiply it by 100 links, the accumulated clearance, which some refer to as stretch is close to a full pitch or 5/8". So if 99 spaces fit in the distance that 100 spaces were suppose to measure, your chain is done. Here comes the painful part, good chains are not cheap. OEM chains from a dealer can cost upwards of $200+. You don't have to buy an OEM chain in fact most manufacturers don't make them but label products made by two of the most prominent makers of chain DID and RK chains. There are a host of other specialty and aftermarket manufacturers to also choose from. Many of these chains can be purchased around $112 or less. But who wants to be spending this every year or so and what can be done to maximize the life of the part in such a hostile environment? Simple, just clean, lubricate, inspect and adjust your chain as needed every 600 miles or thereabouts. The procedure for most bikes only takes about less than 20 minutes. You do have to be careful as there is a way to do it wrong and make matters worse. You have to exercise care in what you use to clean and lubricate as there are products that can attack the rubber seals embedded in your chain. Avoid so called lubes like WD40 which can actually damage seals because they have a large proportion of their contents are actually petroleum distillates which is a general description solvents, emulsifiers which can break down rubber. Only a small percentage of WD40 is actually lubricant. You can buy dedicated chain lube and cleaners from Motul or Bel_Ray. These can get kinda pricey for the amount of product that you get. You can use a general purpose lube that you can use on your chain and cables such as LPS and Tri-flow. These you can buy at Ace Hardware or from Locksmiths and of course online. The cleaners are actually mild solvents that dissolve old grease and disperse dirt but without harming the o-rings. WD40 does make a product that I like which is their white lithium grease. It's cheap and can be used on chains and side stands. I will be outlining the procedure which is quite simple in a future post.
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